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This Day in History - March 10

March 10

515 BC – The building of the Jewish temple in Jerusalem is completed

241 BC – The Roman fleet sinks 50 Carthaginian ships in the Battle of Aegusa

49 BC – Julius Caesar crosses the Rubicon and invades Italy

1503 – Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor, is born

1629 – Charles I of England dissolves Parliamentary rule to rule alone

1656 – In the colony of Virginia, suffrage is extended to all free men despite their religion

1772 – German romantic poet and critic, Friedrich Von Schlegel is born

1776 – Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense” is published

1783 – USS Alliance wins last naval battle of US Revolutionary War off Cape Canaveral

1785 – Thomas Jefferson is appointed minister to France

1792 – John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute and advisor to the king, dies

1806 – The Dutch in Cape Town, South Africa surrender to the British

1814 – Napoleon Bonaparte is defeated by an allied army at the Battle of Laon, France

1845 – Educator and women’s rights leader, Hallie Quinn Brown is born

1845 – Russian czar, Alexander III, is born

1848 – The Treaty of Guadeloupe-Hidalgo is signed ending the US’ war with Mexico

1861 – West African political leader El Hadj Umar Tall seizes the city of Segou, destroying the Bambara Empire of Mali

1864 – A group of vigilantes hanged Jack Slade.  Slade fired his guns in bars when drunk, but never had been accused of hurting anyone.  When sober, he was genuinely liked by townsfolk

1864 – President Abraham Lincoln promotes Ulysses S. Grant to the rank of lieutenant general of the US Army

1865 – Confederate General William Henry Chase dies

1876 – Alexander Graham Bell makes the first telephone call to Thomas Watson, saying “Watson, come here. I need you.”

1893 – New Mexico State University cancels its first graduation ceremony because the only graduate was robbed and killed the night before

1902 – The Boers of South Africa score their last victory over the British, capturing British General Methuen and 200 men

1903 – Jazz composer Leon Bismarck “Bix” Beiderbecke is born

1906 – A mine explosion kills over 1,000 mine workers in Courrieres, France

1909 – Author Kathryn McLean is born

1910 – Slavery is abolished in China

1913 – Nurse and activist Harriet Tubman dies

1916 – Writer and country veterinarian James Herriot is born

1917 – Turkish troops begin the evacuation of Baghdad as the British beardown

1918 – German Luftwaffe ace in World War II Gunther Rall is born

1920 – The Home Rule Act is passed by the British Parliament, dividing Ireland into two parts, but it is rejected by the southern counties who continue with Anglo-Irish war

1924 – The New York law forbidding late-night work for women is upheld by the Supreme Court

1926 – The first Book-of-the-Month Club selection, Lolly Willowes aka The Loving Huntsman, is published by Viking Press

1927 – Prussia lifts the Nazi ban, allowing Adolf Hitler to speak publicly

1927 – Robert Kearns, inventor of a type of windshield wiper who later won a multi-million dollar judgment against Chrysler and Ford for using his design without permission, is born

1933 – Nevada becomes the first US state to regulate drugs

1940 – Playwright David Rabe is born

1940 – Actor and martial arts expert Chuck Norris is born

1940 – US Undersecretary of State Sumner Welles visits London to discuss a peace proposal with Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain

1941 – Vichy France threatens the use of its navy unless Britain allows food to reach France

1943 – Adolf Hitler calls Field Marshall Erwin Rommel back from Tunisia in North Africa

1944 – The Irish refuse to oust all Axis envoys and deny the accusation of spying on Allied troops

1945 – American B-29 bombers attack Tokyo, killing 100,000

1947 – The Big Four meet in Moscow to discuss Germany’s future

1948 – F. Scott Fitzgerald’s wife Author Zelda Fitzgerald dies in a fire at Highland Hospital

1948 – Foreign Minister Jan Masaryk’s death is reported by the government of Czechoslovakia.  It is said that he committed suicide, but the West didn’t buy it.  Masaryk had indicated Czech interest into participating in the Marshall Plan-- the aid program for postwar Europe, but the Soviets refused to participate.  A communist coup then took place in Czechoslovakia, and President Benes was forced to accept communist government.  Masaryk was one of the few remaining non-communists

1952 – Fulgencio Batista assumes power in Cuba after a coup

1952 – 2nd Prime Minister of Zimbabwe, Morgan Tsvangirai, is born

1953 – North Korean gunners at Wonsan fire on the USS Missouri and the ship returns fire to the tune of 998 rounds

1957 – Founder of al-Qaeda and Saudi Arabian terrorist Osama bin Laden is born

1958 – Actress and producer Sharon Stone is born

1959 – Tibetans revolt and surround the summer palace of the Dalai Lama in defiance of Chinese occupation

1966 – The North Vietnamese capture a Green Beret Camp at Ashau Valley

1969 – James Earl Ray pleads guilty to the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King and is sentenced to 99 years in jail

1970 – The US Army accuses Captain Ernest Medina and four others of committing war crimes at My Lai in 1968

1971 – The Senate approves a Constitutional amendment lowering the voting age to 18

1975 – The North Vietnamese Army attacks the South Vietnamese town of Buon Ma Thout, the offensive that will end with total victory in Vietnam

1980 – Ayatollah Khomeini, leader of Iran, lends his support to the militants holding American hostages in Tehran

1982 – The US bans Libyan oil imports because of their continued support of terrorism

1987 – The Vatican condemns surrogate parenting and test-tube birth and artificial insemination

1988 – Disco star Andy Gibb dies

1992 – Greek bouzouki player and songwriter Giorgos Zampetas dies

1993 – Dr. David Gunn is killed during an anti-abortion protest at the Pensacola Women’s Medical Services clinic, by Michael Griffin

2000 – The NASDAQ Composite stock market index peaks at 5408.60, bursting the dot-com bubble

2012 – Author and illustrator Jean Giraud dies


Written by Crystal McCann

Crystal is the owner of Madison's Media, Madison's CPC and the Chief Administrative Officer for Lanterns. She lives in Texas with her husband and dogs and has two adult children. Writers seeking additional exposure: Ask how you can contribute!


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