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This Day in History - January 6

January 6

1066 – Harold Godwinson is crowned King Harold II of England

1367 – Richard II, son of Edward the Black Prince, is born

1412 – French Saint and heroine, Joan of Arc is born

1540 – Henry VIII of England marries his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves

1605 – Miguel de Cervantes’ first edition of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha

1649 – The English Rump Parliament votes to put Charles I on trial for treason

1681 – 1st recorded boxing match takes place between the Duke of Albemarle’s butler vs. his butcher

1759 – Future President George Washington marries Martha Dandridge Custis

1777 – General George Washington and his Continental Army set up winter quarters in Morristown, New Jersey

1798 – American trapper-explorer Jedediah Strong Smith

1811 – Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner is born

1827 – Confederate General John Calvin Brown is born

1838 – Samuel Morse’s telegraph system is demonstrated for the first time in New Jersey

1861 – The Governor of Maryland, Thomas Hicks, makes known his disapproval of measures to secede from the Union

1878 – US journalist, poet, and biographer Carl Sandburg is born

1882 – Texas US Congressman and Speaker of the House 1940-46, 1949-53, Sam Rayburn is born

1883 – Lebanese-American poet Kahlil Gibran is born

1899 – German engineer Heinz Nordhoff is born

1900 – Maria of Romania, Queen of Yugoslavia and wife of King Alexander, is born

1904 – Japanese railway authorities in Korea refuse to transport Russian troops

1907 – Maria Montessori opens her first school

1910 – Union leaders ask President William Taft to investigate US Steel’s practices

1912 – New Mexico joins the Union as the 47th state

1912 – German scientist Alfred Wegener presents his theory of continental drift

1912 – Actor, producer, philanthropist and founder of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Danny Thomas, is born

1913 – Academy Award-winning actress Loretta Young is born

1918 – Germany acknowledges Finland’s independence

1918 – German mathematician Georg Cantor dies

1919 – President Theodore Roosevelt dies

1920 – English biologist John Maynard Smith is born

1921 – The US Navy orders the sale of 125 flying boats to encourage commercial aviation

1924 – Musician Earl Scruggs is born

1925 – Auto industry pioneer John DeLorean is born

1925 – Finnish long-distance runner Paavo Nurmi makes his first US appearance in New York’s Madison Square Garden and will go on to break two world records

1929 – Mother Theresa arrives in India to help the sick and poor

1935 – Queen Margarita of Bulgaria is born

1937 – The US bans the shipment of arms to Spain

1937 – College football coach and sports commentator Lou Holtz is born

1941 – President Franklin Roosevelt asks Congress to help supply the Allies with their support of the Lend-Lease Bill

1942 – President Franklin Roosevelt announces to Congress that he is authorizing the largest armaments production in US history

1942 – Pan American Airlines becomes the first commercial airline to schedule a flight around the world

1944 – Actress Bonnie Franklin is born

1945 – Boeing B-29 bombers strike Tokyo and Nanking

1945 – Future President George Herbert Walker Bush marries Barbara Pierce

1946 – Ho Chi Minh wins the Vietnamese elections

1946 – Musician, singer, songwriter and a founding member of the band Pink Floyd, Syd Barrett is born

1957 – Pro golfer Nancy Lopez is born

1958 – Moscow announces a reduction of its armed forces by 300,000

1967 – Vietnamese and US troops attack Iron Triangle, northwest of Saigon

1970 – The Wiener Musikverein of Vienna, a Philharmonic Orchestra, is inaugurated

1971 – The Army drops its charges against the alleged cover-up of four officers in the My Lai massacre

1975 – A crowd buying tickets to see Led Zeppelin outside Boston Garden, breaks into the arena and cause thousands in damages

1975 – The North Vietnamese capture Phuoc Binh, the capital of Phuoc Long Province

1977 – John Gardner wins the National Book Critics Circle Award for October Light

1987 – Astronomers report their sighting of a new galaxy, 12 billion light years away

1993 – American trumpet player, bandleader, and composer, Dizzy Gillespie dies

1994 – Two days before the Olympic trials, figure skater Nancy Kerrigan is clubbed in the back of her knee in a Detroit ice rink.  Kerrigan’s rival, Tony Harding, was named to the Olympic team and Harding’s ex-husband Jeff Gillooly met with a group of men who agreed to injure Kerrigan for a fee, so that Harding would have a clear shot at the championship and the US team.  Derrick Smith, one the men involved in the attack, confessed to the FBI, while Harding denied involvement.  However, Gillooly gave up his ex, forcing Harding to change her story, claiming that she wasn’t involved, but she knew but didn’t report the crime to authorities.  She was charged with conspiracy to hinder the prosecution of Kerrigan’s attackers, fined $100,000 and 500 hours of community service.  Meanwhile, Kerrigan and Harding competed at the Olympics.  Harding finished eighth, and Kerrigan took home the silver medal.  In a strange turn of events, Gillooly released tabloid photos of he and Harding having sex. Harding failed at a movie career, and all involved in promoting themselves via talk shows and a celebrity boxing match

1996 – 154 people are killed, and over $3 billion in damages are caused by a blizzard that rocked the Eastern Seaboard, forcing the government to close for almost a week

1999 – French-American pianist Michel Petrucciani dies

2001 – After the presidential ballots are disputed in Florida, George W. Bush is finally and officially declared the winner of the presidential elections

2005 – Former Ku Klux Klan organizer Edgar Ray Killen is arrested as a suspect in the murders of three civil rights workers in Mississippi

2008 – Disney-MGM Studios becomes Disney’s Hollywood Studios

2014 – Janet Yellen becomes the first woman to chair the Federal Reserve Bank


Written by Crystal McCann

Crystal is the owner of Madison's Media, Madison's CPC and the Chief Administrative Officer for Lanterns. She lives in Texas with her husband and dogs and has two adult children. Writers seeking additional exposure: Ask how you can contribute!


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