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This Day in History - December 28

December 28

1065 – Westminster Abbey is consecrated

1612 – Galileo observes a “fixed star,” not realizing that he was observing the planet Neptune

1688 – William of Orange storms London and James II flees

1694 – George I of England divorces his cousin Sophia Dorothea of Celle, accusing her of infidelity and imprisoning her in the castle of Ahlden

1767 – King Taksin is crowned the King of Thailand

1781 – British troops commanded by Major James Henry Craig arrive at John’s Island, outside of Charleston, South Carolina

1793 – Thomas Paine was arrested on charges of treason in France and taken to Luxembourg Prison until President James Monroe had him released in November of 1794.  The details of the charges against him were never released

1822 – Confederate General William Taliaferro is born

1832 – John C. Calhoun becomes the first vice president in US history to resign from office, citing political differences with President Andrew Jackson

1836 – South Australia becomes a British colony

1836 – Spain recognizes independence of Mexico

1846 – Iowa becomes the 29th state

1856 – 28th President of the US, Woodrow Wilson is born

1860 – Harriet Tubman arrives in Auburn, New York on her last mission to free slaves, after having evaded capture for eight years on the Underground Railroad

1869 – A labor union made up of tailors known as the Knights of Labor, hold the first Labor Day ceremonies

1869 – William F. Semple patents chewing gum

1872 – The US Army defeats Apache Indians at Salt River Canyon, Arizona Territory

1882 – English astronomer Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington is born

1885 – Indian National Congress is founded as one of two main political parties in India

1895 – The world’s first commercial movie screening occurs at the Grand Café in Paris, given by the Lumiere Brothers

1902 – American philosopher, educator, and writer Mortimer J. Adler is born

1903 – Hungarian-born mathematician, John Von Neumann is born

1903 – American pianist Earl Hines is born

1904 – Farmers in Georgia burn two million bales of cotton to raise falling prices

1908 – Over 100,000 people are killed by an earthquake in Sicily

1920 – The US resumes deportation of Communists and those suspected of being communist

1932 – Argentine novelist Manuel Puig is born

1933 – President Franklin Roosevelt states, “The definite policy of the United States, from now on, is one opposed to armed intervention.”

1934 – English actress Maggie Smith is born

1936 – Benito Mussolini sends planes to Spain in support of Francisco Franco’s forces

1937 – Composer Maurice Ravel dies

1938 – France orders the doubling of forces in Somaliland, and as a result, two additional warships are sent

1938 – Silent-film star and inventor of the first mechanical brake signal, Florence Lawrence, dies.  Lawrence never patented her inventions and received little credit and no money for them.  She was badly burned while rescuing another actor from a studio fire and had trouble finding work afterward.  She also had a bone-marrow disease that was very painful.  Lawrence poisoned herself to death in Beverly Hills 

1941 – Rear Admiral Ben Moreell requests authority from the Bureau of Navigation to create construction battalions used to build roads and airfields under battlefield conditions, that would be known as “Seabees.”

1943 – Kalmyk inhabitants of the Republic of Kalmukkie are deported by the Soviet Union to Central Asia and Siberia, and many die in route

1946 – The French declare martial law in Vietnam

1948 – Premier Nokrashy Pasha of Egypt is assassinated by the Muslim Brotherhood because of his failure in achieving victory against Israel

1951 – The US pays $120,000 to free four fliers convicted of espionage in Hungary

1954 – Oscar-winning actor Denzel Washington is born

1959 – Croatian politician Ante Pavelic dies

1962 – French and American pianist Michel Petrucciani is born

1964 – South Vietnamese troops retook Binh Gia but lost an estimated 200 soldiers and five US advisors plus 300 more South Vietnamese wounded or missing

1965 – The US bars oil sales to Rhodesia

1968 – Israel attacks a Beirut airport, destroying thirteen planes

1971 – The US Justice Department sues Mississippi authorities for ignoring the voting ballots of blacks

1972 – North Vietnamese officials agree to return to the Paris Peace Talks after 11 days of bombing by the US with the exception of the Christmas break

1972 – King Il Sung becomes the first and only president of South Korea under an amended constitution

1973 – Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s The Gulag Archipelago, 1918-1956, is published.  The book was a literal description of political repression and terror in the Soviet Union.  In 1974, he was arrested, deported and stripped of his citizenship for writing it.  He moved to the US.  Mikhail Gorbachev offered to reinstate his citizenship in the 1980’s, but Solzhenitsyn refused.  However, he returned to live in Russia until his death in 2008

1975 – The Soviet Union’s Central Red Army defeats the New York Rangers 7-3 at an NHL-sponsored hockey game at Madison Square Garden in New York City

1981 – The first American test-tube baby, Elizabeth Jordan Carr, is born in Norfolk, Virginia

1984 – American director and screenwriter Sam Peckinpah dies

1989 – Former Czechoslovak leader Alexander Dubcek is elected chairman of the new Czech Parliament

1991 – Nine are killed and 28 injured in a stampede outside the first annual “Heavy D and Puff Daddy Celebrity Charity Basketball Game.”  The game was put into place to raise funds for AIDS but was oversold.  When the game began, and the ticket holding crowd outside weren’t allowed in, they pushed their way in resulting in the stampede

2004 – American author Susan Sontag dies

2007 – Nepal abolishes its monarchy

2015 – English singer, songwriter, bass player and actor Lemmy dies


Written by Crystal McCann

Crystal is the owner of Madison's Media, Madison's CPC and the Chief Administrative Officer for Lanterns. She lives in Texas with her husband and dogs and has two adult children. Writers seeking additional exposure: Ask how you can contribute!


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