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This Day in History - January 2

January 2

366 – The Alamanni cross the Rhine River, invading the Roman Empire

1492 – King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella’s Catholic forces take Granada, the last Muslim kingdom in Spain

1570 – Tsar Ivan the Terrible’s march to Novgorod begins

1758 – The French bomb Madras, India

1776 – The Continental Congress publishes the Tory Act resolution, enacting steps for the colonies to follow in the handling of Americans who remain loyal to the British and to King George

1788 – Georgia becomes the fourth state

1811 – Federalist Senator from Massachusetts, Timothy Pickering, becomes the first senator to be censured.  He was accused of violating congressional law by publicly revealing secret documents communicated by the president to the Senate

1839 – Louis Daguerre takes the first photograph of the moon

1860 – Urban Le Verrier announces the discovery of the planet Vulcan, yet the planet was never actually sighted

1861 – The USS Brooklyn prepares to aid Fort Sumter

1861 – Wife of President William Howard Taft, Helen Herron Taft, is born

1863 – Union troops defeat the Confederates at Stone’s River near Murfreesboro, Tennessee

1866 – Australian scholar, and chairman of the League of Nations 1923-1928, Gilbert Murray, is born

1873 – French nun Therese of Lisieux is born

1890 – President Benjamin Harrison welcomes the first female White House staffer, Alice Sanger

1892 – English mathematician and astronomer George Biddell Airy dies

1897 – Writer Stephen Crane’s boat, The Commodore, sinks off the coast of Florida but he survives

1903 – President Roosevelt closes a post office in Indianola, Mississippi for refusing to hire a black postmistress

1904 – US Marines are sent to Santo Domingo to help the government fight rebel forces

1904 – American general and diplomat James Longstreet dies

1905 – Russians surrender Port Arthur to the Japanese

1905 – English composer Michael Tippett is born

1918 – Russian Bolsheviks threatened to re-enter the war unless Germany returns occupied territory

1920 – American writer of over 300 books, Isaac Asimov, is born

1923 – Secretary of the US Department of Interior, Albert Fall, resigns in response to public outrage over the Teapot Dome scandal.  During the scandal, Fall set aside a large oil deposit in Wyoming called the Teapot Dome and then secretly began signing leases with big western oilmen, allowing them to exploit the “reserve.”

1923 – The black town of Rosewood, Florida is burned by a white mob, following a white woman, Fanny Taylor’s accusation that she had been sexually assaulted by a black man who was believed to be hiding in Rosewood

1925 – US Admiral, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under President Reagan and George H.W. Bush, Ambassador to the UK under President Clinton, William J. Crowe, is born

1928 – Japanese spiritual leader Daisaku Ikeda is born

1932 – Japanese forces in Manchuria establish a puppet government called Manchukuo

1935 – The Bruno R. Hauptmann trial begins in Flemington, NJ, for the kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby

1936 – Nazi officials claim that their treatment of Jews is not the business of the League of Nations

1936 – Singer, songwriter, and actor Roger Miller is born

1942 – The city of Manila and the US Naval base at Cavite are captured by the Japanese

1942 – The Navy Airship Patrol Group 1 and Air Ship Squadron 12 are established, aka as blimp bases

1942 – US general, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 1997-2001, Hugh Shelton is born

1943 – The Allied forces capture Buna in New Guinea

1947 – Mahatma Gandhi begins to march for peace in East-Bengali

1948 – Journalist who while working for the New York Times, was involved in two major controversies, Judith Miller is born.  The first, using faulty information in her coverage of Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction and the other, concerning outing of CIA agent Valerie Plame

1956 – Oklahoma Sooners defeat Maryland 20-6 in the Orange Bowl in Miami, scoring their 30th straight victory in a winning streak that went on for 47 games

1958 – Soprano Maria Callas walks out of a performance after the first act of Bellini’s Norma in Rome, despite most of Rome’s high society being in attendance including the president of Italy.  While Callas claimed illness, she was criticized for being a diva as was known for dramatic walkouts and fights with rivals

1959 – The first spacecraft to fly by the moon and orbit the Sun, Luna 1, is launched by the USSR

1960 – Italian cyclist Fausto Coppi dies

1963 – The Viet Cong down five US helicopters in the Mekong Delta killing a reported 30 Americans and seriously injure a larger South Vietnamese force killing 80 and injuring over 100

1967 – What is known to be the biggest air battle of Vietnam to date, US Air Force F-4 Phantom jets down seven Communist planes over North Vietnam

1967 – Future President, Ronald Reagan, is sworn in as governor of California

1968 – Academy Award-winning actor Cuba Gooding Jr., is born

1971 – A stampede breaks out at Ibrox Stadium in Glasgow, Scotland, where fans were gathered for a soccer match between Scotland and England.  As fans attempt to leave the game after a late goal by Scotland, the west terrace of the stadium partially collapses, killing 66 people as they fall towards the stairway and/or are crushed in the following stampede towards the exit.  145 are seriously injured.  This was the worst soccer disaster in Scottish history but not the first.  In the same location, stairway 13, in 1902, the west terrace again partially collapses, and dozens of fans fall 45 feet to the ground and the rest, stampede in a panicked rush to the exits.  Again in 1961, two people were killed and dozens injured and yet again in 1967, 24 were injured, but still no design changes had been made before this game in 1971

1973 – The US admits to the accidental bombing of a Hanoi hospital

1974 – President Richard Nixon signs the Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act into law, setting a new national maximum speed limit

1980 – President Jimmy Carter asks the Senate to delay the arms treaty ratification in response to Soviet action in Afghanistan

1980 – Former model Sherry Lansing becomes the first female studio production lead when she is named as the leader of the production department at 20th Century Fox and one of the highest-paid female executives in any industry, after she signed a three-year contract at a minimum of $300,000 per year plus bonuses

1981 – British police arrest the “Yorkshire Ripper” serial killer, Peter Sutcliffe, ending one of the largest manhunts in history.  Sutcliffe began his attacks by killing prostitutes, beating them with a hammer and stabbing them and often mutilating them after killing them.  Later on, Sutcliffe began targeting college students.  At the time of his capture, he had killed 13 women and was sentenced to life in prison.  During the manhunt for Sutcliffe, authorities had interviewed over 250,000 people, and thousands of homes had been searched.  When Sutcliffe was finally captured, it was by chance.  He was pulled over driving a stolen car, a prostitute as his passenger, and with him, his hammer and knife

1989 – Indian playwright, actor and director Safdar Hashmi dies

1994 – Rudolph Giuliani is inaugurated as the Mayor of New York City

1995 – Somalian military officer, politician and third president of Somalia, Siad Barre dies

1999 – A severe winter storm drops temperatures to -13 Fahrenheit and dumps 19 inches of snow in Chicago.  The storm claimed the lives of 68 people

2006 – A coal mine explosion in Sago, West Virginia kills 12 miners and critically injures another

2009 – A rare and unrestored 1937 Bugatti Type 575 Atalante Coupe was found in the garage of a British doctor.  In the following month, the car will be sold at an auction in Paris for $4.4 million


Written by Crystal McCann

Crystal is the owner of Madison's Media, Madison's CPC and the Chief Administrative Officer for Lanterns. She lives in Texas with her husband and dogs and has two adult children. Writers seeking additional exposure: Ask how you can contribute!


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